baby wildebeest thinks car is its mom

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We all know what it’s like to take a liking to a car (especially a quality used car from The Auto Connection). But this baby wildebeest takes it a step further and thinks this car is his mother. Watch this touching story unfold. (Post comes compliments of AutoBlog.com.) 

Seeing this lost baby wildebeest mistake a Hyundai Tucson for its mother is equal parts cute and pitiful, but don’t worry. There’s a happy ending.

The young wildebeest (also known as a gnu) was part of the yearly migration in Africa, when it got separated from its mom. The calf’s herding instincts kicked in, and it began to follow passing cars, according to National Geographic. Someone grabbed their video camera as the creature struggled to keep up with a passing Hyundai Tucson crossover.

At one point, when the vehicle stops, the animal attempts to suckle from its tire. A sad “Aww” is appropriate here.

As NatGeo states, wildebeests migrate northward in large herds in May and June in search of greener pastures. For younglings, their herding instinct causes them to follow large moving objects, which would usually be an adult of the same species. In this case, it happened to be a passing car, but luckily the herd showed up to reclaim their young sojourner.

At the end of the video, the calf reunites with its mother and can be seen getting that sip of milk the Hyundai was unwilling to give up. Then they trot off together. (Happy “Aww” time).

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